His divisive view

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In reference to Charles E. Moore's Nov. 3 Forum commentary "I Plead Guilty: Entrepreneurs Like Me Have Enabled Our Crippling Nanny State": Mr. Moore calls himself a "driven American entrepreneur." His letter pits liberals against conservatives. Sequestration, government shutdown and near debt default are the fruits of this battle.

While Mr. Moore may be a small businessman, his employees, customers and daily contacts are varied. These are people who buy groceries, rent or buy homes, attend schools, buy insurance and even send their children to dance class. Our government has to work for all of these folks. We can't pick and choose the parts we like and ignore the rest. America would look very different if a committee appointed by The Heritage Foundation ran the "playground."

Mr. Moore cited the Rough and Ready Sawmill in Oregon as a victim of government regulations. Its operations were based on American national lands -- lands that are used and held in trust for all Americans. Without reasonable regulations there is no incentive other than profit to care for national resources. We may hate to see a business fail -- real people lose real jobs. However, other timber companies must buy and sell within regulations.

It is too bad Mr. Moore sees two different camps -- one successful and proud, the other apologetic and decayed. Conservatives, liberals and others get up and go for the same reasons. We work hard, care for our friends and families, care for our country and make the best choices possible.

GLENN "BUD" SLOAN
Hermitage


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