School tax fairness

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I want to respond to George Wolukis' Nov. 2 letter "Fairer Taxation," which said that the use of property taxes to fund schools is not fair. He suggests a higher sales tax. It's too much to get into, but a sales tax hurts the poor and middle class more than the property tax. But that's a different argument.

Mr. Wolukis says that renters don't pay property tax. However, the owner of the home where the renters reside does pay property tax. These owners raise the rent in order to cover their expenses, including the expense of property taxes. Is this not apparent?

Also, Mr. Wolukis says he has no children or grandchildren in his current school district. But when ( and if) he did have kids in school, there were people who had no children, or people whose kids had graduated or people over 65, who still paid property taxes to help him get his kids through school. If they didn't, his taxes would be four to five times higher and he never would have been able to afford to send his kids to the school district where he sent them.

Even people who never had kids wouldn't have been able to attend the good schools they did when they were young because their parents wouldn't have been able to afford the taxes if they were four to five times higher.

Ninety-nine percent of us wouldn't have been able to go to the schools that we did. It is disturbing that people whose property taxes were kept lower because everybody paid them, suddenly don't want to pay them anymore to help people whose current kids are in school. By the way, I am a senior citizen and I am definitely not rich.

SAL SABATUCCI
Beechview


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