Corporate-shill groups should be investigated

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I can't remember another time when I have been so disgusted by our political system. The Internal Revenue Service was behaving perfectly appropriately when it investigated the real purpose of those astroturf, bogus grassroots organizations that were sponsored and paid for by corporate interests, and then pretended that their purpose was patriotism rather than deregulation and not taxing the richest of the rich.

The formation of the Tea Party itself has ties to executives of big tobacco interests and the Koch brothers' group "Citizens for a Strong Economy."

Several other of these astroturf groups were formed specifically to foster denial of climate change. Of course, they deal in industries that use a lot of industrial chemicals, so it is clear to see where their real interests lie. These groups deserve investigation and exposure of their real purposes.

Remember how Nixon used the IRS to punish those on his "enemies list" and there were no conservative cries of outrage then. The Democrats sit on their hands when it comes to defending themselves, and the Republicans, who behaved even worse and for lesser "reasons," go all righteous on us again. And the result: We get a government that steals from elderly savers and poor students and rewards the corporate crooks, the bankers and the financiers.

For sure, we can't think of the Tea Party as a legitimate third party, since its members have sold out to the Koch brothers, who bought them a few hotdogs and sponsored their meetings in public parks, traveled to via public roads, where the Tea Partiers could haul their Medicare-paid scooters from their trunks and proceed to the bandstands to demand that the government exit their lives.

A pox on all of politics. We desperately need a third party.

MARY GOLDEN
Carrick


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