War by proxy

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Kudos to Tony Norman for his column on the 10th anniversary of the war on/with Iraq ("Decade Later, Iraq War Foes Look Only Wiser," March 26). In view of the growing involvement in Syria by the United States, his note of optimism that the protest movement in 2003 and afterward would make war with Iran/Syria less likely may be somewhat inaccurate.

Recently, The New York Times reported that the United States, via the CIA, is helping to deliver weapons to some anti-Bashar Assad forces in Syria. Secretary of State John Kerry proclaimed in his recent trip to Iraq that Bashar Assad had to be removed from power. So for all intents and purposes, the United States is at war with Syria but through proxies, just as with the Contras in Nicaragua in the 1980s

The war in Syria is the Iraq War redux with just a different set of actors. Bashar Assad replaces Saddam Hussein, President Barack Obama replaces George W. Bush and armed Syrian insurgents replace U.S. forces. It is cheaper to do war with proxies, and the population at large can be duped as to what is going on.

The mainstream press plays along as it did with weapons of mass destruction, just as Mr. Norman says. Obsession with removal of a leader who doesn't kowtow to Israeli and U.S. wishes remains the same and the press is a faithful cheerleader. The end result will be a devastated country just as Iraq currently is -- where religious and ethnic differences are exploited such as to make the state ungovernable.

This is supposed to be bringing democracy to the Middle East. It is all a call to the barricades once more.

MICHAEL DROHAN
Wilkins


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