No-rules roadway

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Two more recent fatal accidents on Route 28, although they happened under very different circumstances, have something in common: These two tragedies once again shine a light on the no-rules driving that is the hallmark of the entire stretch of Route 28, and on its death toll.

Only on Route 28 can you go 65 mph through a 35 mph construction zone at 6:15 a.m. and still be tailgated as if you're doing 15. Only on Route 28 do people actually zoom up to cut you off so that you can't merge, seemingly with the intent to cause an accident. Only on Route 28 do people drive 40 mph over the posted speed limit, all to stop at the same bottleneck with the people who were driving a more reasonable speed, which, mind you, is at least 20 mph in excess of the posted speed limit just in order to keep from being run off the road. I see this because I drive Route 28 at least twice a day during my commute and I observe the craziness. I am in awe that there isn't a fatal accident every day.

There are no rules and no consequences for how you drive on Route 28, and the regular drivers of 28 know this. That's why the road is notorious and why people who aren't used to driving it hate it so much. They can't keep up because it's unlike any other road out there.

Route 28 is the Wild West. You can do anything you want on it with no fear of getting a ticket. Until the police actually do something about the nonexistent reinforcement of driving laws on 28, people are going to continue to die.

So the next time you feel like doing 90 or tailgating someone until you're in their backseat, come over to my side of the river . . . We welcome your kind!

NICOLE PACELLA DEFAZIO
O'Hara


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