Coca-Cola advocates making informed choices

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The Post-Gazette's Jan. 22 editorial "Marketing Twist: Coke's New Ads Pitch Exercise and Low-Cal Drinks" misrepresents The Coca-Cola Company's commitment to be a valued partner in the fight against obesity around the world and right here in Pittsburgh.

Through a series of new advertisements, the company is telling people about its efforts to help create meaningful solutions to obesity. These ads also emphasize the importance of making informed choices about what we eat and drink and balancing "calories in" with "calories out." This new initiative is in print, broadcast, digital and out-of-home media as well as marketing activation.

People consume many different foods and beverages, so no one single food or beverage alone is responsible for people being overweight or obese. But all calories count, whatever food or beverage they come from. It is misleading to blame obesity, which has risen during the last 10 to 15 years, on one single product like soda. During the time obesity has been increasing, we've been introducing more choices with fewer calories -- we now have more than 180 low- and no-calorie options. People have responded by choosing these different options. This is one reason why the consumption of sugar from pop in the United States has decreased by 39 percent since 2000.

Coca-Cola is already helping support physical activity initiatives through local Pittsburgh-area programs like America Is Your Park, the Boys & Girls Clubs of America's Triple Play, school fitness centers and more.

Coca-Cola will continue to advocate for collaboration because we believe that with honest, collective action we can succeed.

DeANN BAXTER
Public Affairs & Communications
The Coca-Cola Company
Robinson


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