Political motives behind attacks on Susan Rice

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Susan Rice has served our nation well as U.N. ambassador, and she is reportedly under consideration by President Barack Obama for appointment as secretary of state to succeed Hillary Clinton. Sen. John Kerry apparently is the other main contender for that appointment.

PG columnist Dan Simpson wrote that "efforts ... to hang Ms. Rice are entirely politically motivated." In light of critical remarks from Sens. John McCain, Lindsey Graham and Kelly Ayotte after their private meeting with Ms. Rice and the acting director of the CIA, there ought to be no question concerning the politicization of this hoked-up kerfuffle about the attack on our consulate in Benghazi, Libya.

Think about why an attempted character assassination of Susan Rice is possibly being carried out. Some consider it just another racially motivated effort to strike at President Obama, akin to unsuccessful attempts to discredit Attorney General Eric Holder over the "Fast and Furious" matter.

That seems a bit facile, especially since there's another explanation. If Susan Rice's reputation is sufficiently besmirched and Mr. Kerry is appointed secretary of state, Mr. Kerry's Senate seat would become vacant. In all likelihood, Scott Brown -- the Republican Massachusetts senator defeated by Elizabeth Warren last month -- would return to the Senate.

Politics works in strange ways; in the game of pool, this is known as a bank shot.

WILLIAM J. BROWN
Squirrel Hill


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