Reagan's sorry role

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Although I enjoy Tony Norman's columns, I think "Lucky for the Gipper He Can't See Today's GOP" (Nov. 9) is a bit off base. He seems to suggest that Ronald Reagan would be too moderate to appeal to today's GOP. I think that Reagan was the architect of where the Republicans are today.

Many of the election ploys used today by the GOP were started under Reagan but were perhaps more subtle. Racism was used to bring some long-standing Southern Democrats to vote for Reagan. Stories like the young buck on food stamps buying steaks and the use of the term "states' rights" were part of the New Southern Strategy. Lip service to those who would have legal abortion abolished was used to bring those voters his way. Trickle-down economics was espoused. The debt wasn't an issue for the GOP when Reagan and Bush were in office. It was only under Democratic leadership that the debt was deemed our biggest problem.

I do agree that instead of re-evaluating, the Republicans will double-down on the problems that kept them from winning this election. From day one of the Democratic victory I believe opposition by GOP congressmen will be considered their way to victory in the next election.

The sad part of this strategy is the ginning up of hatred for fellow Americans. Don't know if that was begun by Reagan, but it is real today and very hurtful to governing and to all of us.

So while Reagan may be revered by some, to my mind he played a big part in the sorry state of politics now.

CHARLOTTE RAAB
Leet


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