Weird and weirder: The NRA disavows its temporary bout with sanity

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Call us crazy, but the pro-gun activists in Texas who have taken to brandishing semiautomatic weapons in fast-food restaurants seem outside what the Founding Fathers intended when the Second Amendment was written. The National Rifle Association seemed to agree: An article on its Web site rightly criticized the “downright weird” antics from zealots who had “crossed the line from enthusiasm to downright foolishness.”

Naturally, the NRA has had to firmly disavow its temporary bout of sanity. The post has since been removed from its website, replaced with a video of its chief lobbyist reaffirming the association’s dedication to open-carry and conceal-carry laws.

The about-face is a sad depiction of the warped politics of guns in the United States — not even the Newtown tragedy could motivate Congress to pass sensible controls. Since then, more than 50,000 Americans have died due to gun violence. Developed countries with sensible restrictions have fractions of that number.

Yet, the gun lobby hasn’t stopped. The NRA hasn’t found a gun rights expansion it doesn’t like. The solution to school shootings? More guns. Stand your ground? Check. Openly carrying assault rifles through the streets? Checkmate.

Just last week, one person died and three were injured in a shooting at Seattle Pacific University. You might have missed that story though — nowadays, it usually takes more deaths to make headlines.

 

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