Citizens, care about your neighborhoods

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I was totally disappointed with the poor turnout of volunteers for the cleanup of the Lincoln Place area on Saturday. Four adults were at the meeting place for the start at 9 a.m. All four volunteers, who were well over 50 years of age, cared enough about a very large and populated location to be there. I am 61 years old and it was extremely hard for me to bend down to pick up trash for more than three hours.

I started to clean my street by myself until 10:15 when a nice lady and two teens showed up. The one teen was an exchange student from Sweden. I can only imagine what he thought about Pittsburgh after picking up beer bottles, trash and fast-food containers in a residential neighborhood. He told me in Sweden there is nothing like this happening because people take pride in neighborhoods and don’t litter to begin with.

There was, and is, way too much litter to expect volunteers to keep up with it. A nonchalant attitude seems to prevail in most communities nowadays about litterbugs. After all, if people cared about their neighborhoods, then there wouldn’t be garbage along the city streets to begin with.

In the future, people who have “community service” to serve or some prisoners should have this duty, as they do in many U.S. cities. The reality is that communities ask for volunteers to do a huge, never-ending task, when the problem is a nonchalant attitude that someone else will clean up the messes.

Oh, I went by the street I cleaned on Saturday only to see more trash dumped within 12 hours of the cleanup. My hard work seemed to be in vain.

KATHLEEN FORSYTHE

Lincoln Place


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