Homework loads

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In regard to the article “Studies Show Homework Isn’t Much of a Burden” (March 19): As a junior at an extremely rigorous high school, I would have to disagree. Ask any high school student at my school, North Allegheny, as well as most teachers, and they will tell you the amount of homework has increased from even just a decade ago. Looking at the bigger picture, this increase in schoolwork can be attributed to the increasingly high amounts of pressure high school students are under, from parents and the schools themselves. A recent article from the Huffington Post discusses the fact that teenagers are more stressed than adults, stating adults rate their stress at 5.1 on a 10-point scale, while teenagers reported 5.8 on the same scale. A healthy level of stress is 3.9, as reported by the American Psychological Association’s 2013 survey about stress.

As a student in advanced courses, I can say firsthand that homework loads are becoming tough for students to handle. Many people I talk to, as well as myself, spend a minimum of 3.5 hours each day on homework. Add on even just one extracurricular activity or sport, and the day slowly runs out of hours to get work completed.

I am not suggesting that homework should be eliminated, for I do believe it helps a student reiterate what he or she has learned in school. However, I think more adults, especially parents, should be aware of just how much their children have on their plates each night of the week. Just to give a blanket statement that student workloads have not increased is not a fair representation of the educational system we have today.

MARIA GRAZIANO
McCandless


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