Logic ties violent video games to violence

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In response to the self-serving Perspectives piece by Daniel Greenberg (“Playing Games: A Pa. Commission Spreads Fallacies About Video Games,” March 4): Mr. Greenberg (a video game designer), in a blatant attempt to vindicate the violent video game industry, posits that the Joint State Government Commission’s Advisory Committee on Violence Prevention’s yearlong study on the matter failed in its attempt to tie violent video games to actual violence. Without invoking censorship, do any rational people think that the future behavior of children is not affected if they are immersed in watching videos day after day that depict murder and mayhem?

He further states (citing no sources) “that small children know the difference between reality and make-believe.” Say that after taking a small child to see a scary movie and have him or her afraid to go to sleep at night because “there is a monster under my bed.”

How about the readily available pornography on computers, showing repeated violence against women? Might that addiction lead to the thinking that women are to be treated as objects and that any behavior against them is OK? Does anyone believe that bad behaviors like compulsive gambling and obsessive drug abuse, addictions to porn or violent videos can’t lead to human tragedies? It’s a different story when it’s your kid who’s gunned down or your wife who is raped or your family who is ruined by out-of-control gambling and drug use.

AL ANDREWS
Mt. Lebanon


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