True grit

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Searching for an authentic, two-legged American hero to admire? If so, might I humbly recommend Megan Rice.

The 84-year-old anti-nuclear activist nun was recently sentenced to 35 months in prison for penetrating the “supposedly” impenetrable Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. (“Peace Activists Sentenced,” Feb. 19 Pittsburgh Press). She, along with two other activists, successfully breached three fences before reaching a half-billion-dollar uranium storage bunker. The trio then, along with other minor acts of vandalism, splashed human blood from baby bottles on the bunker wall, to symbolize the blood of children spilled by nuclear weapons. It took embarrassed security forces two hours to apprehend the aging (57, 63, 84) desperados.

Instead of thanking the activists for exposing serious security flaws at the guarded facility, our government is throwing them into the pokey.

Sister Megan has been arrested dozens of times for civil disobedience and has served two six-month sentences for trespassing during protests against the infamous School of the Americas.

The intractable Roman Catholic nun advised U.S. District Judge Amul Thapar before sentencing, “Please have no leniency with me. To remain in prison for the rest of my life would be the greatest gift you could give me.”

Sleep tight, America! Another dangerous terrorist is behind bars!

ROB BILLER
Fombell


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