Chatham, lower tuition and chief's earnings

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Chatham University is considering admitting male students to its undergraduate programs because not enough women are interested in a single-sex educational environment (“Chatham Going Coed?” Feb. 19). Perhaps more women would be interested in Chatham if the tuition were lower. Tuition and fees are just over $31,000 this academic year (and that doesn’t count room and board, which adds about another $10,000 per year).

According to a Dec. 13, 2013, story in the Post-Gazette, Chatham’s president, Esther Barazzone, “earned $1.8 million in 2011, making her the eighth-highest-paid chief executive of a private nonprofit college or university in the United States.” By contrast, the chief executive of the University of Pittsburgh, Mark Nordenberg, earns about one-third of that amount, and administering Pitt’s budget of just under $2 billion is certainly a more demanding job than administering Chatham’s budget.

If President Barazzone were to donate the difference between her salary and Mr. Nordenberg’s to a Chatham scholarship fund — more than $1 million, the equivalent of 100 $10,000 scholarships — more students could afford to attend Chatham and it wouldn’t need to sacrifice its single-sex educational policy.

ALAN MEISEL
Squirrel Hill


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