Saturday Poem / The Truth of Consequences

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Foreseeable or not, it made us

  wince the way that Kennedy’s

  public murder made us wince.

We headed for home exactly

  as we did four decades back.

We sat like mutes before

   a screen and watched.

                                               And watched.

Overnight, the President re-named

   America the “Homeland.”

                                                   Travail

   and travel by air became

   one and the same.

                                       Architects

   competed to design the ultimate

   memorial.

                       Pulpit and public

   oratory droned like Muzak

   on demand.

                      Attempting to assuage,

   one mayor noted that three

   thousand victims numbered less

   than one month’s highway deaths

   across the country …

                                  But nothing

   could blur the filmed moment

   of impact, the slowly buckling

   floors and girders and glass,

   a blizzard of papers swirling

   in smoke, and finally two people

   out of thirty-nine who chose

   to jump instead of burn — a man

   and woman, probably co-workers,

   plummeting together hand-

   in-hand from the hundredth floor

   to ground zero at thirty-two

   feet per second per second.

Samuel Hazo is distinguished professor of English emeritus at Duquesne University and director of the International Poetry Forum (samhazo1@earthlink.net).


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here