Obituary: Wayne D. Glenn / Entrepreneur who turned to art in retirement

July 23, 1937 - Feb. 28, 2009

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Kathy Glenn laughs when she remembers her husband.

"He never said a bad word about anybody, although I tried to get him to," she said.

Wayne D. Glenn, an executive and entrepreneur who became an art teacher in his retirement years, died Saturday of lymphoma. He was 71.

Born July 23, 1937, in Leechburg, Mr. Glenn graduated from Allegheny College in 1959. Shortly after graduating, his brother George, president of Penn Glenn Oil Works in New Kensington, died, and Mr. Glenn took the reins of the family-owned firm.

He remained there until 1977, when he retired. But in Mr. Glenn's case, retirement simply meant moving on to something new. He and his wife, the former Kathy Sabotka of Creighton, established Kathy's Koffee, operating a dozen coffee machines in the offices of local businesses. After about 15 years, Mrs. Glenn said, "then he got interested in painting."

"He saw Bill Alexander on television and he did a painting in a half-hour, and he said, 'I'm going to do that.' "

So he got certified with Mr. Alexander, and with Bill Ross, another painter who teaches via television, and he and Mrs. Glenn opened Glenn's Art Studio in Creighton.

"If you came to the studio, you'd go home with a completed painting that day," Mrs. Glenn said -- if not one you painted, then one Mr. Glenn gave you. "He said, 'I consider the art studio a nonprofit organization,' " she recalled, again with a laugh.

Mr. Glenn was a member of the Oakmont Presbyterian Church and was a 32nd degree Mason.

Besides his wife, he is survived by a daughter, Susan Masters, of Elida, Ohio; a son, Douglas Glenn, of Seattle; and a sister, Nancy Steimer, of State College, Centre County.

A funeral will be held at 10:30 a.m. today at Oakmont Presbyterian Church, 415 Pennsylvania Ave., Oakmont.


Elwin Green can be reached at egreen@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1969.


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