Pope Francis, Obama discuss plight of poor

Leaders stay divided on contraception


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VATICAN CITY -- Face to face for the first time, President Barack Obama and Pope Francis focused publicly on their mutual respect and shared concern for the poor on Thursday. But their lengthy private discussion also highlighted the deep differences between the White House and the Catholic Church on abortion and birth control.

The gaps were evident in the differing accounts Mr. Obama and the Vatican gave of the meeting, with Mr. Obama stressing the two leaders' common ground on fighting inequality and poverty while Vatican officials emphasized the importance to the church of "rights to religious freedom, life and conscientious objection." That point by church officials referred to a major disagreement over a provision of Mr. Obama's health care law.

The meeting inside the grand headquarters of the Roman Catholic Church marked a symbolic high point of Mr. Obama's three-country visit to Europe. For a president whose approval ratings have slipped since winning re-election, it was also an opportunity to link himself to the hugely popular pope and his focus on fighting poverty.

"Those of us as politicians have the task of trying to come up with policies to address issues," Mr. Obama said following the meeting. "But His Holiness has the capacity to open people's eyes and make sure they're seeing that this is an issue."

The president said the plight of the poor and marginalized was a central topic in their talks, along with Middle East peace, conflicts in Syria and the treatment of Christians around the world. Social issues, he said, were not discussed in detail.

However, the Vatican left out any reference to inequality issues in its description of the meeting. In a written statement, church officials instead said discussions among not only the pope and president but also their top aides centered on questions of particular relevance for the church leaders in the U.S., making veiled references both to abortion and a contraception mandate in Mr. Obama's health care law, which is under review by the Supreme Court.

Mr. Obama and Pope Francis, two of the world's most recognizable men, both appeared nervous as they shook hands before entering the Papal Library.

"I'm a great admirer," Mr. Obama said to the smiling pope. The two men then sat across from each other at a wooden desk for a private meeting that lasted 52 minutes, well beyond the half-hour that had been scheduled.

The president then presented the pope a seed chest with fruit and vegetable seeds used in the White House Garden, in honor of the pope's announcement earlier this year that he is opening the gardens of the papal summer residence to the public.

The chest was custom-made of leather and reclaimed wood from the Baltimore Basilica, one of the oldest Catholic cathedrals in the U.S, and inscribed with the date of Thursday's meeting.

The pope's gift to Mr. Obama included a copy of his papal mission statement decrying a global economic system that excludes the poor. The president said he would keep it at the White House and read it during frustrating moments in the Oval Office.

Although the Vatican has not yet confirmed the trip, it is likely that Pope Francis will travel to the U.S. in September 2015 for the church's World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia.

Mr. Obama has visited the Vatican once before as president, meeting with Pope Benedict XVI in 2009. But Mr. Obama's meeting with the current pope was more highly anticipated, given their shared economic philosophies and Pope Francis' own global popularity.

Italy was Mr. Obama's third stop on a weeklong overseas trip that previously took him to the Netherlands and Belgium. From Rome, Mr. Obama was headed to Saudi Arabia, the final stop on his trip.


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