Late Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher could certainly turn a phrase

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"I don't mind how much my ministers talk, as long as they do what I say."

-- 1980 (BBC)

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"Any woman who understands the problems of running a home will be nearer to understanding the problems of running a country."

-- 1979, the year she became prime minister (BBC)

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"I am not a consensus politician. I'm a conviction politician."

-- 1979 (BBC)

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"Remember George, this is no time to go wobbly." -- George H.W. Bush recalling Mrs. Thatcher's advice during the Gulf Crisis. He was awarding the Presidential Medal of Freedom to her in 1991. (Associated Press)

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"Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people's money." -- Interview on Thames TV's "This Week" program with Llew Gardner, 1976

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"To those waiting with bated breath for that favorite media catchphrase, the U-turn, I have only one thing to say: You turn if you want to. The lady's not for turning." -- to the Conservative conference in 1980 (BBC, the Guardian, other sources)

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"We had to fight the enemy without in the Falklands. We always have to be aware of the enemy within, which is much more difficult to fight and more dangerous to liberty." -- Taking on the miners union in the mid-1980s. (BBC)

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"I don't think there will be a woman prime minister in my lifetime." -- as education secretary in 1973 (BBC)

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"My policies are based not on some economics theory, but on things I and millions like me were brought up with: an honest day's work for an honest day's pay; live within your means; put by a nest egg for a rainy day; pay your bills on time; support the police. -- Interview, September 1981 (The Mirror)

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"I might have preferred iron -- but bronze will do. It won't rust. This time, I hope the head will stay on." -- at 2007 unveiling of her statue in Parliament. Five years earlier, an art gallery vandal decapitated a marble statue of Mrs. Thatcher (Reuters)

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