New Ideological Battle in Pakistan: Traffic Circle's Name

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LAHORE, Pakistan -- If ever a squabble over a street name could sum up a nation's identity crisis, it is happening in Lahore, Pakistan's cultural capital.

Late last year, a group of Lahoris made progress in getting local officials to rename a busy traffic circle for Bhagat Singh, a Sikh revolutionary who was hanged at the site by the British in 1931 after a brief but eventful insurrection against colonial rule. They see it as a chance to honor a local hero who they feel transcends the ethnic and sectarian tensions gripping the country today -- and also as an important test of the boundaries of inclusiveness here.

But in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, questions of religious identity also become issues of patriotism, and the effort has raised alarm bells among conservatives and Islamists. The circle was named in 2010 for Chaudhry Rehmat Ali, a Muslim student who coined the name Pakistan in the 1930s, and there was an outcry at the news that it might be renamed for a non-Muslim.

"If a few people decide one day that the name has to be changed, why should the voice of the majority be ignored?" asked Zahid Butt, the head of a neighborhood business association here and a leader of the effort to block the renaming.

The fight over the traffic circle -- which, when they are pressed, locals usually just call Shadman Circle, after the surrounding neighborhood -- has become a showcase battle in a wider ideological war over nomenclature and identity here and in other Pakistani cities.

Although many of Lahore's prominent buildings are named for non-Muslims, there has been a growing effort to "Islamize" the city's architecture and landmarks, critics of the trend say. In that light, the effort to rename the circle for Mr. Singh becomes a cultural counteroffensive.

"Since the '80s, the days of the dictator Gen. Zia ul-Haq, there has been an effort that everything should be Islamized -- like the Mall should be called M. A. Jinnah Road," said Taimur Rahman, a musician and academic from Lahore, referring to one of the city's central roads and to the country's founder. "They do not want to acknowledge that other people, from different religions, also lived here in the past."

A recent nationwide surge in deadly attacks against religious minorities, particularly against Ahmadi and Hazara Shiites, has again put a debate over tolerance on the national agenda. Though most Sikhs fled Pakistan soon after the partition from India in 1947, the fight over whether to honor a member of that minority publicly bears closely on the headlines for many.

A push to honor Mr. Singh has been going on here for years. But it was not until the annual remembrance of his birth in September that things came to a head. A candlelight demonstration to support renaming the traffic circle had an effect, and a senior district official agreed to start the process. As part of it, he asked the public to come forward with any objections. The complaints started pouring in.

Traders of Shadman Market, the local trade group led by Mr. Butt, threatened a strike. Chillingly, warnings against the move were issued by leaders of the Islamic aid group Jamaat-ud-Dawa, largely believed to be a front for the militant group Lashkar-e-Taiba. Clerics voiced their opposition during Friday Prayer.

The issue quickly became a case for the city's High Court, which said it would deliberate on a petition, initiated by Mr. Butt and a coalition of religious conservatives, to block the name change. That was in November, and the case still awaits a hearing date. The provincial government has remained in tiptoe mode ever since. "It is a very delicate matter," said Ajaz Anwar, an art historian and painter who is the vice chairman of a civic committee that is managing the renaming process.

Mr. Anwar said some committee members had proposed a compromise: renaming the circle after Habib Jalib, a widely popular postindependence poet. That move has been rejected out of hand by pro-Singh campaigners.

Mr. Rahman and other advocates for renaming the circle paint it as a test of resistance to intolerance and extremism, and they consider the government and much of Lahore society to have failed it.

"The government's defense in the court has been very halfhearted," said Yasser Latif Hamdani, a lawyer representing the activists. "The government lawyer did not even present his case during earlier court proceedings."

The controversy threatens to become violent. On March 23, the anniversary of Mr. Singh's death, police officers had to break up a heated exchange between opposing groups at the circle.

Mr. Rahman and the other supporters have vowed to continue fighting, saying it has become a war over who gets to own Pakistan's history.

"There is a complete historical amnesia and black hole regarding the independence struggle from the British," Mr. Rahman said, adding of the Islamists, "They want all memories to evaporate."

world

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.


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