Stargazing: Jupiter and the stars of winter


Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Jupiter and the brilliant stars of winter are now visible above the southeastern horizon at 8 p.m. When searching for Jupiter, first locate Orion and the three stars that form his belt. Two stars mark Orion's shoulders and two more his knees. Betelgeuse, located in Orion's right shoulder, is a red giant star. Dazzling bright Jupiter shines about 20 degrees to the upper left of Betelgeuse in the constellation of Gemini. Tonight, the waxing gibbous moon sits about 10 degrees above Betelgeuse. The bright star Rigel, in Orion's knee, is the opposite of Betelgeuse. It is a very hot blue star.

A line drawn up through Orion's belt will lead to Taurus and its bright star, Aldebaran. A line drawn down through the low side of Orion's belt will lead to the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius in Canis Major. Canis Minor and its bright yellow-white star, Procyon, are 20 degrees below Jupiter and 25 degrees to the lower left of Betelgeuse.


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here