Random Acts of Kindness: Worker descends from high up to teach how to jump a battery


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I recently hired the teenage son of a friend of mine to help me with some yard work.

While he was working, I came outside to chat with him and suddenly his unoccupied car began to make strange noises that neither of us understood.

When he tried to start the vehicle, he found the battery was dead. I didn’t think I could use my AAA membership to start his car and I couldn’t find any neighbors who had jumper cables, so he began to make phone calls to try to get some help.

As we stood, pondering our next move, he noticed some people walking into a house at the bottom of the hill. I didn’t know who they were, but he decided to walk down to see if they could help.

A few minutes later he returned with jumper cables in his hands, but he told me he had never used them before and he would have to call someone to walk him through the process.

When I moved my car I noticed a Verizon worker high up in a basket working on a pole. I yelled up to him to see if he knew how to use jumper cables. Not only did he know how, but he immediately lowered his basket and walked over to the cars.

Like a loving father, he explained and demonstrated step by step exactly what to do and what not to do and the car started right up. The man had no way of knowing that the teenager who was helping me had lost his father when he was a little boy.

He refused to take any money for helping, but he performed a random act of kindness by helping to start the car and by doing it just as he would have taught his own son how to do it. I also learned that the following day, a few other strangers patiently taught this young man how to install a new battery in his car.

RUTH YAHR
Greenfield

Trucker made special effort to return couple’s lost keys

One afternoon my husband and I went to GetGo to fill up the gas in both cars.

I pulled up in front, and he proceeded to fill up my tank, after which I headed back home. As I walked in the door, the phone was ringing. It was a stranger, asking me if I had lost my car keys.

For a minute, I was puzzled. After all, I had just parked my car in the garage. How could I be missing my keys? The caller then identified herself, saying she was from Market Express in McMurray and a trucker had turned in a set of keys that included my Advantage Card.

Suddenly, I realized my husband must be standing near a pump at GetGo searching for these keys and hearing other customers asking him to move his car. I hurried back to Market Express to retrieve the keys and rescue my husband from his dilemma.

We came to the conclusion that while filling the gas in my car he had laid the keys on the trunk before I drove off. The keys were found by the trucker lying on the street between Market Express and Beinhauer Funeral Home. He was kind enough to turn back and return them to the store to get them back to their owner.

Many thanks to this observant gentleman for going out of his way and saving us a lot of frustration.

MARGE MUELLER
Bridgeville

Gift certificate was no good; one stranger was very good

On a Friday afternoon some of our seniors went to Olive Garden for lunch.

I had a gift certificate, but imagine my surprise when I realized the gift certificate given to me had already been used. This dear lady whom I did not know volunteered to pay the rest of my bill for me. May God bless you.

MAE JONES
Homewood

 

The lost diamond ring seemed gone for good

My husband purchased me a beautiful diamond ring as a surprise for my 40th birthday last summer. I wore the ring this past weekend and lost it! We had gone to many places that day and called every one but Costco, which was closed. I was devastated. This ring not only was gorgeous but it held a special meaning.

The first thing the next morning, I called Costco and the woman checked the safe and said nothing was found. I tore my house apart. I was up the entire night. I then called Costco again and asked, as a last resort, if I could check the watermelon bin I had been digging in. The manager agreed and said I could come before the store opened and staff could help me.

When I arrived a staff member told me that a colleague had found a diamond ring that he hoped was mine. It was! I was ecstatic! I cried and hugged the manager who brought my ring to me and asked if I could personally thank the person who found it. I never did find out who he was, but left my name and number for him if they figure it out. This just shows that there are good people out there. This person could have easily put my ring in his or her pocket but instead chose to do the right thing. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, you are wonderful.

SHARON HART
Mars

A wayward driver’s license flies home

On July 31 I was traveling from the Pittsburgh airport. After all the security screening, I realized I had dropped my driver’s license at some point. Fortunately, I had another picture ID that allowed me to continue my journey to Texas.

When I arrived, I called my mom, who gave me the phone number for PennDOT (it’s on the back of your license, by the way) so I could get instructions on getting a replacement when I returned home. But several days later, it was my mother who called me: an airport rep had mailed the license to my home in Pittsburgh.

A big, big thank you to the person who found the license and turned it in. And another big thanks to the employee who returned the license to me with a cover letter, making it official. In my haste, I threw the cover letter away, so I don’t have a name. You both know who you are. You saved me time, trouble, worry and money, and I’m so very grateful.

NORTHE CAMPBELL-ESCALANTE
Churchill

For a stranded sports car driver, sporting hospitality

Aug. 23 was a beautiful day for a “top down” ride in the countryside in my 1961 Triumph TR3. About 20 cars participated — Triumphs, MG’s and a Morgan — from the Western PA Triumph Club. Enjoyed a nice lunch on Route 88 after the ride through the countryside.

On the way home, my bright red 1961 TR3 decided it had too much fun and wanted to rest on Lebanon Church Road. Fortunately for me, I was able to pull into the Comfort Inn’s parking lot. While I was trying to restart the TR3, the hotel registration hostess was thoughtful enough to bring bottles of water for me and my two friends who were helping me. The maintenance fellow also came to our rescue and helped push the TR3 to see if it would start. Not so lucky...

Both of these fine people were extremely nice and helpful — of course, I didn't get their names. They invited me into the air-conditioned lobby while I waited for the AAA tow truck. Comfort Inn Hospitality at its best! Thanks also to AAA for prompt response and service.

HERSHEY DUGAN
Shadyside

A U.S. Postal Service worker makes an extra special effort

As I prepared to go out of town on vacation, I was dismayed that my mail-order prescription had not arrived. Granted, it was my fault for waiting so late to order my refill, and the company did give me a date to expect delivery, which was the day I was leaving for vacation, but, nevertheless, I eagerly awaited my mailman and to see if he had the package a day early for me. He did not.

Well, I assured myself I would be OK missing a couple of days of my medication. I had put a hold on my mail delivery and was certain the medication would be delivered when I returned a week later.

A little later that day, there was a knock at my door. There stood my mailman with the package. He explained it had come in that afternoon for delivery the next day, but based on our conversation, he knew I was leaving and would need it — so he brought it to me.

Thank you to Steve for going out of his way to deliver my medication before I left town. Your kindness is much appreciated — you are a wonderful ambassador for the U.S. Postal Service — and I can’t thank you enough for going above and beyond!

DEB COLOSIMO
Bridgeville

Has someone done you right? Send your Random Act of Kindness to page2@post-gazette.com, or write to Portfolio, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


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