Random Act of Kindness: A fellow runner gave me the zip to get to the finish line


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Another runner encouraged ill woman to finish her race

On Nov, 3, I ran the EQT 10-miler. It was a perfect day and excellent course, but by mile 2, I knew it would be the worst run I ever had.

The beginning signs of the flu had made their presence known the day before, but I was sure I could gut it out. I could not have been more wrong.

Figuring that straight ahead was the fastest way home, I stumbled along to mile 9, at which point I was prepared to walk to the finish.

I slowed down to a trot and then felt a tap on my shoulder.

A fellow runner, dressed in black and wearing sunglasses, pointed straight ahead and waved me on.

She jogged with me until I could pick up my feet and run on.

She stayed by my side through that mile, not saying a word, but her encouragement gave me the strength to do what I couldn't do on my own.

Although her actions surely cost her seconds from her own finish time, she willingly helped a struggling fellow runner to the finish line.

I looked for her at the end to thank her for her support, but I lost her in the crowd.

I would like to thank this runner for recognizing how much I needed help and for sacrificing her own finish to help me to mine.

While running can be a solitary sport, thanks to this thoughtful stranger I will be on the lookout for runners in need in my next (hopefully flu-free) race.

MARY QUINN

Mt. Lebanon

 

Little boy learned his lesson about offering help to others

My husband and I stopped at the Brighton Hot Dog Shop in Cranberry on Sept. 28 for a quick lunch.

We sat in one of the booths and a cute little waitress took our order. When she brought our hot dogs, fries and drinks, she also put down our check.

About the same time, a father and his young son (I would estimate the little boy's age to be around 7 or 8) sat across the aisle from us.

After the waitress took their order, as she walked past our table she took our check. We wondered why she did that. We assumed that she may have made a mistake and gave us the wrong check.

When we were finished eating, she came back to see if we wanted anything else. I told her no, we would just like the check. She told us that the little boy sitting across from us had bought our lunch! She said that his father was teaching him random acts of kindness.

As we were leaving, we stopped by their table to thank them. My husband did most of the talking because I was too emotional to speak -- I was so touched by their gesture. They very humbly accepted our thanks and told us to have a nice day.

I don't know if they will ever see this letter, but we want them to know that we will never forget them or their kindness. They will be kept close in our hearts and in our prayers.

CAROLE FULTON

Wexford

 

A stranger across the street volunteered to tote furniture

Summer was past and it was time to put the wicker porch furniture in the basement.

I was able to carry the light pieces of furniture around to the back of the house, but I needed help with the heavy settee. My husband, who has had health problems, came to help me when we heard a voice call out, "Do you need help over there?"

This nice man who was doing work in a house across the road came over and carried the heavy piece of furniture, and then all the rest of the furniture, into the basement.

What a random act of kindness! We are so grateful for this man who helped two senior citizens that day.

MARJORIE MEYER

Hampton

 

Has someone done you right? Send your Random Act of Kindness to page2@post-gazette.com, or write to Portfolio, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


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