Random Act of Kindness: Female customer in restaurant came to rescue of bloody nose


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My husband and I had just started eating lunch at Wendy's on Steubenville Pike in Robinson when my nose, unexpectedly, began bleeding heavily.

I was busy using one napkin after another to try to stop the bleeding when a woman customer walked into the restaurant, noticed my situation and came over to our table to ask if I was having a problem. I managed to say, "I can't get the bleeding to stop."

She asked if I would like some ice to use, and I said that I would. She then walked back to the kitchen and asked for some ice, which they gave her along with a large napkin and a plastic bag. She brought them over to me and then stood by the table to see if there was anything more she could do.

The ice did help the bleeding to stop fairly soon and I was able to leave the restaurant, but could do little more than say a quick "thank you" to the lady. Her concern and assistance made it possible for me to get the bleeding under control and was very much appreciated.

No one else in the restaurant noticed my situation or offered help. She was a true Good Samaritan.

BERYL JOHNSON

Moon



Neighbors and a stranger organized help for couple

My husband has had four back surgeries in the past year and a half. Last month I fell down our stairs, so we were both out of commission, as I was on a walker plus wearing a stabilizer.

Our neighbors have been wonderful, doing everything from shopping and cooking to taking us for doctor appointments, shoveling the snow and making sure the Post-Gazette is by our front door.

We can't thank them enough. However, when one was going to be gone for two months, she told me she had someone to take over her duty moving our newspaper. I assumed it was one of our other friends. Well, I have found out it is a woman that doesn't even know us and walks through our neighborhood every morning.

We would like to thank her but do not know who she is. Such a wonderful and kind gesture to do for strangers -- we appreciate your kindness very much.

JANE HARVATH

West View



Diners' casual encounter led to a free meal for two

My wife and I recently drove to the Waterfront Eat'n Park to have breakfast with friends we have known for 40 years.

We parked and walked to the entrance. As I opened the outside door for my wife and then tried to open the inside door, I began a quaint dance of awkwardness with a large gentleman who held the outside door, then held the inside door for my wife and me. We went inside, and while we waited for our friends, the waitress seated the gentleman and, later, his mother.

Our friends did not show up, and we decided we'd sit down and start our breakfast. So at 9 we went in to be seated, right across from the friendly, large gentleman, who remarked on how long it had taken us to be seated. We told him we had been waiting for friends, who had yet to show up.

And so we had our breakfast, while still looking for our friends. At one point, the manager went over to the large man's table and they had a conversation of some sort. The man and his mother left. And then we told the waitress we would like the bill.

"That's taken care of," she said. What did she mean?

"Well, that gentleman ..." -- she pointed at the now empty table -- "... paid your bill."

"Did he leave a tip?" my wife asked.

"Yes, he did."

I asked her if she knew him. "No."

Do you know his name? "No."

What a way to begin the new year. My wife and I were giddy with surprise and pleasure. It is not a matter of the money -- Eat'n Park provides a very reasonably priced buffet -- it was the generosity of his random act of kindness toward total strangers.

I hope that he reads this and knows that I thank him, though he is unknown to me.

MYRON TAUBE

Squirrel Hill

intelligencer

Has someone done you right? Send your Random Act of Kindness to page2@post-gazette.com, or write to Portfolio, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15222. First Published February 28, 2013 5:00 AM


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