Random Acts of Kindness: Holy popcorn hero, Batman!


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Coming to aid of popcorn woman made him a hero just like Batman

My family and I were attending the first midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises" on July 20 with some friends.

I decided to go to the concession stand, and my husband and son stayed behind to save seats. After the employee filled my order, I realized I was going to have a hard time walking back to the theater with three large drinks and two large popcorns.

Out of the blue, a nice, young man who looked liked he just came from work asked me if I was going back to theater 6. When I told him no, theater 4, he said that he would walk me back into the theater and carry my popcorn for me.

I was amazed!

I am sorry I did not ask him his name. We small-talked back to theater 4, and he said it was going to be a long day at work, since the movie let out at 3:10 a.m.

With all the unfortunate events that have happened lately related to "The Dark Knight Rises," I just wanted to say thank you to this kind and thoughtful person. I will never forget your random act of kindness. Believe me, it doesn't happen every day!

CATHY SAWCHAK

Brentwood



Smart phone was left behind, but the right person found it

My wife and two daughters and I decided on July 23 to take the trolley to the Pirates game.

We usually drive and park for the games, but my kids really wanted to go on the trolley. We decided to catch the trolley at Washington Junction. As we waited, I put my new iPhone down on the bench.

Moments later the trolley arrived and my family was excited to get on. I jumped up from the bench and joined them, not noticing that my valuable iPhone remained behind on the bench.

I realized my error as we approached PNC Park and I tried reaching for my phone to check the time.

I was ready to exit the trolley and catch one back to Washington Junction to see if the phone somehow could still be there.

But before I exited, my wife called my phone and a young man answered. He stated that he was on a different trolley and was on his way to the ball game too.

We agreed on a spot to meet, and 15 minutes later I had my phone back in my hands. I never got the young man's name, but I want to thank him again.

My faith in humanity was reinforced that evening!

BOB RAFFAELE

Whitehall



Shopper's health problems led to generosity in checkout line

With my wife housebound and too ill to shop, I was recovering from pneumonia at age 84. Even though I had recently been hospitalized for six days, I had to do the shopping.

Blood oxygenation remains poor during recovery, leaving one easily sapped. I had also lost more than 25 pounds during the illness, so I evidently didn't look too healthy.

When I went to Sam's Club at Mount Nebo Pointe to get a few needed goods, I utilized one of their powered sit-down carts to get through the store more easily.

It so happened that the cart kept backing up slowly when turned off to obtain an item, so it had to be switched on and off frequently, making the trip even more tiring. Then, while checking out, I stood up to get out my wallet for the Sam's Club card, then chose to charge it on a different card.

While I was occupied finding the second card, a young man behind me said, "I'll get it!"

As I turned and tried to object to this kind stranger footing my payment of $60, he said, "Too late."

Since he had already swiped his personal credit card, I thanked him heartily and said he needn't have done that. He stuck to his guns and asked me on the way out if I was OK.

Such purely voluntary kindness from a total stranger is most rare and heartening, and I wish I could thank him again personally, but my receipt didn't show his name or personal information.

This occurred several weeks ago, so I sure hope he reads this!

RICHARD R. EVERSON

Ross

intelligencer

Has someone done you right? Send your Random Act of Kindness to page2@post-gazette.com, or write to Portfolio, Post-Gazette, 34 Blvd. of the Allies, Pittsburgh, PA 15222.


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