Wash. mountain search halted

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

MOUNT RAINIER NATIONAL PARK, Wash. -- It's too dangerous right now to search for the bodies of six climbers who likely plummeted to their deaths while attempting one of the more technical and physically grueling routes to the peak of Mount Rainier in Washington state, park officials said Sunday.

Like others who have died on the mountain, there's a possibility the two guides and four climbers believed to have fallen 3,300 feet from their last known location may never be found, the park officials said.

"People are very understanding that we cannot risk another life at this point," Patti Wold, a Mount Rainier National Park spokeswoman, said Sunday.

Lake Michigan search begins

CHICAGO -- As many as four people were missing and two others were rescued after a power boat capsized and sank in Lake Michigan's chilly waters near Chicago, the Coast Guard said Sunday.

The boat capsized Saturday evening en route to Chicago's Burnham Harbor from New Buffalo, Mich., a Coast Guard official said. No radio call for help was received.

A man and women were unresponsive when rescued. The man later told authorities that his power boat caught fire before it sank.

Cousteau grandson will dive

ISLAMORADA, Fla. -- Like viewers worldwide, Fabien Cousteau was entranced by his famous grandfather's films about marine life and human exploration underwater. Now he's adding to his family's sea stories with a 31-day underwater expedition in the Florida Keys.

Mr. Cousteau is set to dive Sunday to Aquarius Reef Base, a school bus-sized laboratory 60 feet below the ocean's surface, a few miles off Key Largo. He plans to spend more than a month living underwater with a five-person crew, making a documentary and leading science experiments on the nearby coral reef.

The younger Mr. Cousteau can do something his grandfather could not: broadcast the entire adventure live online and communicate with the public through social media and video chats with classrooms on land.

"For the first time I'm able to invite the world on a Cousteau expedition in real time," said Mr. Cousteau, who has filmed documentaries on sharks and other marine life.

Chains seek to go gun free

DALLAS -- Two national chain restaurants have asked that customers refrain from bringing firearms into their establishments, saying the weapons can create an uncomfortable atmosphere for other diners.

Sonic Drive-In and Chili's Grill & Bar both issued statements Friday requesting that customers keep their guns out of their restaurants even if they have an open carry permit.

The request, which stops short of an outright ban, came after members of the gun-rights group Open Carry Texas walked into Texas-area outlets of Sonic and Chili's carrying assault rifles.

Dallas-based Brinker International Inc, which owns the Chili's chain, said in a statement it was dedicated to providing "a safe environment for our guests and team members."

Open Carry Texas said on its Facebook page it would "cease taking long guns into corporate businesses unless invited."

Also in the nation ...

Identical twins in Ohio who were born holding hands and sharing the same amniotic sac and placenta are making progress toward going home from the hospital, their parents say. ... A strike at downtown Las Vegas casinos was averted as union negotiators reached settlements with several properties only hours before workers were scheduled to walk off their jobs.

-- Compiled from news services


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here