National briefs: Sharpton says he helped FBI

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NEW YORK -- The Rev. Al Sharpton admitted on Tuesday that he helped the FBI investigate New York Mafia figures in the 1980s, even making secret recordings that appeared to help bring down a mob boss.

But at a news conference, Mr. Sharpton insisted he never considered himself a confidential informant, despite a report identifying him as the "CI-7" referenced in recently released court records.

"I was never told I was an informant with a number," Mr. Sharpton told reporters at his Harlem headquarters in response to the report posted Monday on The Smoking Gun website. "In my own mind, I was not an informant. I was cooperating with an investigation."

Three charged in beating

DETROIT -- A teenager and two other men were charged Tuesday in the brutal beating of a 54-year-old suburban Detroit man after he accidentally hit a child who stepped off the curb into the path of his truck.

Police meanwhile credited a nurse with saving the life of Steve Utash by stepping between him and the half-dozen or more men who punched and kicked him after the April 2 accident on the northeast side of Detroit.

The incident left Mr. Utash, a tree-trimmer from Macomb County's Clinton Township, with severe head injuries.

Stiletto murderer convicted

HOUSTON -- A Houston woman was convicted of murder Tuesday for fatally stabbing her boyfriend with the 5½-inch stiletto heel of her shoe, hitting him at least 25 times in the face.

Prosecutors said Ana Trujillo used her high heel shoe to kill 59-year-old Alf Stefan Andersson during an argument at his Houston condominium in June.

Trujillo's attorney had argued the 45-year-old woman was defending herself during an attack by Andersson, a University of Houston professor and researcher.

Strippers hired by home

MELVILLE, N.Y. -- A Long Island nursing home hired male exotic dancers to perform for its patients, according to a lawsuit filed in State Supreme Court in Suffolk County.

The suit, filed March 13, claims that East Neck Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in West Babylon, N.Y., hired "male strippers to perform" as a regular occurrence for residents.

Howard Fensterman, the attorney representing the nursing home, said a committee of 16 residents voted unanimously for a male stripper to come in to entertain in September 2012.

Bernice Youngblood, 85, a resident of the nursing home, and her son, Franklin Youngblood, initiated the lawsuit after the son found a photograph of his mother stuffing cash inside the waistband of a male dancer clad only in white briefs.

Experts push sex education

LOS ANGELES -- Health experts have some simple advice for reducing the teen birthrate in the U.S. -- make sure teens learn about abstinence and birth control before they start having sex.

It sounds obvious, but it's obviously needed, according to a report released Tuesday by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among teen girls who were sexually experienced, 83 percent told interviewers that they didn't get formal sex education until after they'd lost their virginity.

Altogether, 91 percent of young women between the ages of 15 and 17 said they'd taken a formal sex education class that covered information about birth control or ways to say no to sex (and 61 percent said they'd learned about both). In addition, 76 percent of girls in this age group discussed one or both of these topics with their parents.


-- Compiled from news services

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