National briefs: Archbishop to sell mansion

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

SMYRNA, Ga. -- Trying to appease angry parishioners, the Roman Catholic archbishop of Atlanta said Saturday that he will sell a $2.2 million mansion just three months after he moved in.

Archbishop Wilton Gregory announced the decision following a closed-door meeting with members of several church councils at his headquarters north of Atlanta. He publicly apologized Monday for building the Tudor-style residence and will move out in early May.

Archbishop Gregory said last week that if the church sold the new mansion, he would seek to live in a setting more modest than his current or previous home.

Iran to buy plane parts

CHICAGO -- Boeing Co. said Friday that it received U.S. government approval to export certain spare parts for commercial airplanes to Iran.

A Boeing spokesman said that the parts were needed to ensure safe flight, but he declined to describe them further or put a dollar amount on them. The spokesman, Marc Birtel, said Boeing's last delivery to Iran was a 747-100 jumbo jet in August 1979 -- three months before American hostages were seized at the U.S. embassy in Tehran.

Drug-smuggling tunnels

SAN DIEGO -- The two new tunnels discovered this past week along the San Diego-Mexico border mark the sixth and seventh cross-border passages that authorities have located in the last four years. Officials have found more than 80 tunnels from California to Arizona since 2006.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in San Diego announced the discovery of the two new drug-smuggling tunnels Friday, calling them sophisticated and elaborate.

Mormon marriage stance

SALT LAKE CITY -- A top Mormon leader reiterated the church's opposition to gay marriage Saturday during the church's biannual general conference.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints' stance on homosexuality has softened in recent years, but a statement by Neil Andersen of the Quorum of the Twelve marks the second consecutive conference in which leaders took time to emphasize the faith's insistence that marriage should be limited to unions between a man and a woman.

Army's hairstyle curbs

WASHINGTON -- A new U.S. Army regulation that bans an array of natural hairstyles has sparked some backlash, with African-American women arguing that the rule has a racial and cultural component.

Released on Monday, Army Regulation 670-1 includes multiple rules that specifically address hairstyles such as cornrows, twists and braids that are popular with African-American women. Among the unauthorized styles are dreadlocks and twists, which have been banned since 2005, and braids must be small in diameter.


Join the conversation:

Commenting policy | How to report abuse
To report inappropriate comments, abuse and/or repeat offenders, please send an email to socialmedia@post-gazette.com and include a link to the article and a copy of the comment. Your report will be reviewed in a timely manner. Thank you.
Commenting policy | How to report abuse

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here