Obama to announce future of spy programs

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WASHINGTON-- Faced with Edward Snowden's first leaks about the government's sweeping surveillance apparatus, President Barack Obama's message to Americans boiled down to this: Trust me. "I think on balance, we have established a process and a procedure that the American people should feel comfortable about," Mr. Obama said in June, days after the initial disclosure about the National Security Agency's bulk collection of telephone data from millions of people.

But the leaks kept coming. They painted a picture of a clandestine spy program, run by the National Secureity Agency, that indiscriminately scooped up phone and Internet records, while also secretly keeping tabs on the communications of friendly foreign leaders, such as Germany's Angela Merkel.

Today, Mr. Obama will unveil a much-anticipated blueprint on the future of those endeavors. His changes appear to be an implicit acknowledgement that the trust he thought Americans would have in the spy operations is shaky at best. His focus is expected to be on steps that increase oversight and transparency, while largely leaving the programs' framework in place.

The president is expected to back creation of an independent public advocate on the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which approves the bulk collections and now only hears arguments from the government. And seeking to soothe international anger, Mr. Obama will extend some privacy protections to foreigners and increase oversight of the process used to decide on foreign leader monitoring.

In previewing Mr. Obama's speech, White House spokesman Jay Carney said Thursday that the president believes that the government can make surveillance activities "more transparent in order to give the public more confidence about the problems and the oversight of the programs."

For Mr. Obama, the reality of the public's fraying trust settled in slowly over a summer of relentless disclosures based on the 1.7 million documents that Mr. Snowden is believed to have stolen while working for the NSA as a contractor. The revelations chased Mr. Obama abroad, becoming a centerpiece of summits with world leaders and a long-planned meeting with Ms. Merkel in Berlin.

By August, Mr. Obama acknowledged that his initial assumptions about how the public would respond to the revelations had been "undermined." In announcing the review that would culminate in today's speech, he said, "I think people have questions about this program."

People close to the White House say Mr. Obama's approach appears to reflect a president who has come to appreciate the effectiveness of the tools at the government's disposal.


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