Former PPG exec arraigned on second-degree murder charges

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A former high-level executive at PPG Industries was arraigned this morning on two second-degree murder charges in connection with a fatal car crash in New Hampshire earlier this month.

Those charges replaced previous charges of reckless manslaughter filed against Robert Dellinger, 53, after New Hampshire authorities said he crashed into an SUV Dec. 7, killing the man and pregnant woman inside and their unborn child.

State officials said Mr. Dellinger, former chief financial officer at Downtown-based PPG told them he was depressed and attempting to commit suicide at the time of the crash.

Diana Fenton, assistant attorney general for the state of New Hampshire, declined to comment on why prosecutors upgraded the charges against Mr. Dellinger except to say, "Looking at the facts and the evidence, we felt that the upgraded charges were appropriate."

At an arraignment this morning, Special Justice Lawrence MacLeod ordered Mr. Dellinger to stay in the Grafton County House of Corrections without the possibility of leaving on bail. His attorney could not immediately be reached for comment.

Neither the attorney general's office nor the court would immediately release criminal complaints filed today to an out-of-state news agency.

State authorities have said in the past that Mr. Dellinger crossed a median while driving a pickup truck on Interstate 89 in Lebanon, N.H., crashing into the SUV carrying Jason Timmons, 29, and Amanda Murphy, 24, who was eight months pregnant. The couple from Wilder, Vt., were engaged to be married.

Mr. Dellinger owns a home in Sunapee, N.H., about a half hour away from the town where the crash occurred. He left PPG in June 2011, citing health issues. Officials have said he argued with his wife about his antidepressant medication on the morning of the crash.

His attorney, R. Peter Decato, told state authorities Mr. Dellinger has been receiving treatment for mental health issues in Kansas, where he owns a house and where he worked for Sprint-Nextel about 10 years ago.



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