National briefs: School begins in Chicago under guard

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CHICAGO -- Thousands of Chicago children whose schools were shuttered last spring walked to new ones on the first day of school Monday under the watchful eye of police officers and newly hired safety guards there to provide protection as the kids crossed unfamiliar streets -- many of them gang boundaries.

No incidents of trouble were reported, police said. While that didn't surprise parents and grandparents, they said they were still concerned that the city's obvious show of first-day force won't keep their children safe in the weeks and months to come.

Under the Safe Passage program, guards clad in neon vests lined Chicago streets.

Chicago Public Schools, the nation's third-largest school district, closed almost 50 schools last spring in the hopes of improving academic performance and saving millions of dollars. About 12,000 of the district's 400,000 students were affected by the closures.

Sen. McConnell pressured

WASHINGTON -- A conservative group is launching a radio ad challenging Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to oppose any money for President Barack Obama's health care law even if it means triggering a government shutdown.

The Senate Conservatives Fund is spending nearly $50,000 on the 60-second commercial that will begin airing today in Kentucky, where Mr. McConnell is locked in a tough race for a sixth term. The GOP leader faces both a primary rival, businessman Matt Bevin, and a Democratic foe, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

2 teens tied to vet's death

SPOKANE, Wash. -- Authorities released new details Monday about two teenage boys who are charged with the murder of Delbert Belton, an 88-year-old World War II veteran, saying the motive of the attack was robbery and that family members helped lead police to their second suspect.

Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub said Demetrius Glenn and Kenan Adams-Kinard, both 16, have been charged with first-degree murder and first-degree robbery.

The Glenn youth turned himself in last week and the Adams-Kinard youth was arrested early Monday morning.

Both teens will be charged as adults, according to Lenna England, secretary for the gang unit of the Spokane County prosecuting attorney's office, which is handling the case.

JPMorgan loses judgment

NEW YORK -- Billionaire Leonard Blavatnik won a $42.5 million breach-of-contract award against JPMorgan Chase over claims the bank stuffed a fund with risky mortgage securities and lost 10 percent of his $1 billion investment. Mr. Blavatnik lost a negligence claim against the bank.

Mr. Blavatnik, 56, ranked 51st on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index with a net worth of $15.6 billion, sued JPMorgan in 2009 in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan, accusing the biggest U.S. bank by assets of putting more money into mortgage securities in his CMMF fund than investment guidelines allowed.

Justice Melvin Schweitzer, who presided over a two-week trial this year, ruled that J.P. Morgan Investment Management broke its contract with the CMMF fund by exceeding a 20 percent cap on mortgage securities, according to an Aug. 21 judgment made public Monday that awards interest on top of damages.

-- Compiled from news services

CHICAGO -- Thousands of Chicago children whose schools were shuttered last spring walked to new ones on the first day of school Monday under the watchful eye of police officers and newly hired safety guards there to provide protection as the kids crossed unfamiliar streets -- many of them gang boundaries.

No incidents of trouble were reported, police said. While that didn't surprise parents and grandparents, they said they were still concerned that the city's obvious show of first-day force won't keep their children safe in the weeks and months to come.

Under the Safe Passage program, guards clad in neon vests lined Chicago streets.

Chicago Public Schools, the nation's third-largest school district, closed almost 50 schools last spring in the hopes of improving academic performance and saving millions of dollars. About 12,000 of the district's 400,000 students were affected by the closures.

Sen. McConnell pressured

WASHINGTON -- A conservative group is launching a radio ad challenging Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to oppose any money for President Barack Obama's health care law even if it means triggering a government shutdown.

The Senate Conservatives Fund is spending nearly $50,000 on the 60-second commercial that will begin airing today in Kentucky, where Mr. McConnell is locked in a tough race for a sixth term. The GOP leader faces both a primary rival, businessman Matt Bevin, and a Democratic foe, Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

2 teens tied to vet's death

SPOKANE, Wash. -- Authorities released new details Monday about two teenage boys who are charged with the murder of Delbert Belton, an 88-year-old World War II veteran, saying the motive of the attack was robbery and that family members helped lead police to their second suspect.

Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub said Demetrius Glenn and Kenan Adams-Kinard, both 16, have been charged with first-degree murder and first-degree robbery.

The Glenn youth turned himself in last week, and the Adams-Kinard youth was arrested early Monday morning.

JPMorgan loses judgment

NEW YORK -- Billionaire Leonard Blavatnik won a $42.5 million breach-of-contract award against JPMorgan Chase over claims the bank stuffed a fund with risky mortgage securities and lost 10 percent of his $1 billion investment. Mr. Blavatnik lost a negligence claim against the bank.

Mr. Blavatnik, 56, ranked 51st on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index with a net worth of $15.6 billion, sued JPMorgan in 2009 in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan, accusing the biggest U.S. bank by assets of putting more money into mortgage securities in his CMMF fund than investment guidelines allowed.

Justice Melvin Schweitzer ruled that J.P. Morgan Investment Management broke its contract with the CMMF fund by exceeding a 20 percent cap on mortgage securities, according to an Aug. 21 judgment made public Monday.

Focus on climate change

PORTAGE GLACIER, Alaska -- As she marveled at a shrinking Alaska glacier, the newly installed leader of the Environmental Protection Agency said Monday that President Barack Obama told her that fighting climate change should be her primary focus.

"The president's main priority for me was to recognize when I was coming in here that this is going to be a significant challenge and one which the administration was going to begin to tackle," said EPA administrator Gina McCarthy.

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