National briefs: Donation tied to Koch kin

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SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Ending a mystery that captivated the run-up to Election Day, the Arizona group behind an anonymous $11 million donation revealed under court order Monday that the shadowy donation was laundered through two groups, including one tied to David and Charles Koch, the billionaire brothers who have played a huge role in spreading anonymous political cash around the country.

The donation, the largest anonymous contribution to a ballot measure campaign in California history, was made to the Small Business Action Committee, a conservative group running a campaign for Proposition 32, the measure that would curb labor's ability to collect political cash, and against Proposition 30, Gov. Jerry Brown's tax-hike initiative.

Ann Ravel, chairwoman of the Fair Political Practices Commission, the state's political watchdog, said Phoenix-based Americans for Responsible Leadership conceded it was the intermediary and not the true source of the contribution. The true source was Americans for Job Security and was made through a second intermediary, the Center to Protect Patient Rights, she said.

Judge OKs ending benefits

ROCHESTER, N.Y. -- A bankruptcy court judge will allow Eastman Kodak Co. to end retiree health benefits at the end of the year as part of its restructuring.

In his ruling Monday, U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Allan Gropper called the move fair and reasonable.

The Rochester-based photography company reached an agreement last month with a court-appointed committee of retirees to eliminate its current $1.2 billion liability for medical, life insurance and survivor benefits. In exchange, Kodak will pay a total of $650 million in claims and $7.5 million in cash into a fund to be used for future payments.

Suzuki files for bankruptcy

BREA, Calif. -- American Suzuki Motor Corp. on Monday filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and said it will cease selling automobiles in the U.S. as part of a plan to restructure its business.

The company, based in Brea, Calif., is the sole distributor of Suzuki Motor Co. vehicles in the continental U.S.

Apple suit thrown out

MADISON, Wis. -- A federal judge on Monday threw out a suit by Apple Inc. claiming that Google subsidiary Motorola Mobility is seeking unreasonably high license fees for the use of patents on wireless technology.

The suit is part of a world-spanning battle between Apple and Google, whose Android software powers the smartphones that compete with Apple's iPhone. Google bought Motorola Mobility this summer to gain control of its patents and gain leverage against Apple in its court battles.

Free-speech ruling

WASHINGTON -- An anti-abortion demonstrator who won the right to display pictures of aborted fetuses at a busy intersection can collect lawyer's fees from local officials, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The justices said that because a South Carolina anti-abortion activist had a free speech right to display photos of aborted fetuses even though they shocked some motorists, he could also claim his legal fees under civil rights law for vindicating his rights in court.

Although the ruling concerned only legal fees, it will likely strengthen the hand of abortion protesters who clash with police or city officials. If they go to court and prevail on any claim, they can force officials to pay their legal costs.

The unsigned decision, based on legal briefs, had no recorded dissent.

-- Compiled from news services

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