Seneca Valley puts proposed 2014-15 budget on public display

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Seneca Valley School board agreed to put the proposed $108 million 2014-15 school budget on public display.

The budget includes a 3.7 mill tax increase and will be available for public review for the next 30 days. School board directors will vote on its final version at their next regular meeting on June 16.

New expenses in this year’s budget include $1 million set aside to purchase new text books and $500,000 budgeted for busing to the newly constructed Cardinal Wuerl High School in Cranberry. The district is mandated to provide like bus services to all private or parochial schools within its boundaries.

The district has seen an increase in its earned income tax collection and the value of a mill of tax has increased by 2.22 percent over this school year. One mill is estimated to bring in $536,540 next school year.

If the proposed budget is approved, a resident with a home market value of $250,000 will pay an extra $125 in property taxes next school year.

School board members also approved a measure to commit $6 million of the district’s $17 million fund balance to help mitigate the costs of upcoming retirement contributions.

The money will be used over the next eight or nine years to help spread out the district’s payments to the Pennsylvania State Employee Retirement System, according to Lynn Burtner, district business administrator.


Laure Cioffi, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.

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