Report: No passive technologies like TV for young kids

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The National Association for the Education of Young Children and the Fred Rogers Center, based at St. Vincent College, today announced guidelines for the use of technology and interactive media in early childhood programs, including recommending prohibiting using TV, videos and other noninteractive technologies for children younger than 2.

The overall guidelines are aimed at programs serving children from birth through age 8.

In terms of some of the youngest children, the report also discourages using passive technology with children 2 through 5.

It recommends limiting interactive technology uses for those younger than age 2 to situations where they "appropriately support responsive interactions between caregivers and children and strengthen adult-child relationships."

Some of the major points, in the words of the official summary, are:

• "When used intentionally and appropriately, technology and interactive media are effective tools to support learning and development."

• "Intentional use requires early childhood teachers and administrators to have information and resources regarding the nature of these tools and the implications of their use with children."

• "Limitations on the use of technology and media are important."

• "Special considerations must be given to the use of technology with infants and toddlers."

• "Attention to digital citizenship and equitable access is essential."

• "Ongoing research and professional development are needed."

The groups' news release stated, "Children are growing up in a technology-rich context, and programs need guidance on how to make informed, appropriate choices about the array of technology and digital media tools in support of children's healthy development and learning just as they must make such choices about other tools in their programs."


Eleanor Chute: echute@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1955.


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