Crafton investment professional charged with bilking customers

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A Crafton man pleaded not guilty today to wire fraud and tax charges, after prosecutors alleged that he bilked investors, and then the tax man, out of six-figure sums over six years.

Albert P. Majkowski, Jr., 56, was involved with several companies, including The Queue, The Fifth Platform, Newborn Industries, Waterfront Wireless and Mosea Media, according to the indictment against him.

From 2005 through 2010, IRS Criminal Investigations agents found, Mr. Majkowski sought out investors who had business ideas and claimed that he was a wealthy, successful businessman. He pledged to use their funds for "bringing their new ideas/businesses to market,” according to the indictment.

One investor entrusted Mr. Majkowski with $117,825, prosecutors allege.

Instead, according to the indictment, Mr. Majkowski spent the funds on himself, family travel, motocross racing and college tuition for his children, a recreational vehicle, maintenance and boarding of a horse and alimony.

The IRS found that Mr. Majkowski received $147,000 in 2007, $213,000 in 2008, $275,000 in 2009 and $75,000 in 2010, but did not pay the taxes due.

Neither Mr. Majkowski nor assistant federal public defender W. Penn Hackney commented after the arraignment before U.S. Magistrate Judge Robert C. Mitchell.

Assistant U.S. attorney James Wilson turned over to the defense statements made by Mr. Majkowski, who was released on unsecured bond. The case now goes to U.S. District Judge Cathy Bissoon for pretrial activity.


Rich Lord: rlord@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1542. Twitter: @richelord.

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