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Green Tree

Manager David Montz announced Nov. 4 that the borough's proposed 2014 budget would not increase taxes and that garbage collection will remain as a municipal responsibility.

Residents will be mailed copies of the proposed spending plan Friday and council members will hold a public budget review session at 7:30 p.m. Monday. In a related matter, action was tabled on a solid waste contract because of an undisclosed discrepancy in the bids. The bidders are Republic Services and Waste Management.

Also, council adopted and approved a three-year arbitration award for the borough's nine-member police force that will provide wage increases of 3 percent in 2013 and 3.25 percent in 2014 and 2015.

* Council unanimously approved the state Department of Transportation's request to repave Greentree Road from 8 p.m. and 5 a.m. in May. between McMonigle and Carnahan roads. The repaving is necessary because of a recent waterline replacement project.

Mr. Montz said PennDOT plans to put down new concrete and temporary asphalt in that section.

By working at night when traffic is reduced, the new surface will be completed more quickly, officials agreed. Workers will be able to complete 200-300 feet a day.

* Councilman Edward Schenck noted that the borough now owns the Green Tree Cemetery on Greentree Road.

Formerly known as the German cemetery, the property was purchased in 1873 by the German United Evangelical Congregation in Temperanceville and later associated with the United Church of Christ in the Elliott section of Pittsburgh.

Because the church's membership has dwindled, the borough has taken over the property, as well as $90,000 of church funds for its upkeep. Mr. Montz estimated that it will cost $5,000-$7,000 to maintain the cemetery, which is located near the Nature Reserve and across from Banbury Lane and Silver Oak Drive.

More than 1,300 graves are in the cemetery.

Mr. Schenck said the borough may be looking for volunteers to help keep up the cemetery.

* Also, Councilman Rino Lindsay reported that 300 pounds of unused prescription drugs were collected in the most recent Drug Enforcement Agency Take Back Day. That amount is about 50 percent more than was gathered in the spring collection, he added.

Moon

Supervisors will continue the conditional use application hearing to convert a building at 1225 Maple Street Extension into a Speedway gas station/convenience store.

Supervisors Andy Gribben and Frank Sinatra were absent. Supervisors Marvin Eicher, James Vitale and John Hertzer voted Nov. 6 to continue the hearing at 7 p.m. Dec. 4 in the municipal building auditorium.

Robert Sweet, who was representing the applicant, said Speedway has responded to concerns of residents about the driveway entrance on Charleton Heights Road. He said restricting the driveway to one-way traffic will reduce lights and traffic.

He also said a 40-foot buffer and a fence will be added. Addressing safety concerns, Mr. Sweet said there would be 16-20 surveillance cameras and that employees would be trained in deterring crime.

Mr. Sweet said that if the township will allow Speedway to be open 24 hours every day, the lights would serve as a crime deterrent. He said if the 24-hour request is turned down, he said Speedway could turn the canopy lights off and use the time to clean and freshen up the site. He also suggested approval of a 24-hour operation on a trial basis for three-six months.

Police Chief Leo McCarthy said the neighboring Unimart used to be open 24 hours a day. He said that since December 2011 there have been three armed robberies at the Unimart, which now operates from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.

Chief McCarthy recommended that Speedway not be open 24/7.

Attorney John Lincosky of Carnegie, speaking on behalf of residents opposed to the Speedway project, said that a gas station and a convenience store is not a permitted use at that location, according to the township zoning map.

Marvin Eicher, supervisors' chairman, asked all parties in this matter prepare legal memoranda to present at the continuation of the hearing.

He also suggested Speedway consider meeting with township staff and PennDOT prior to the hearing because Charleton Heights is a township road. The other roads around the site are state owned.

* Chevron's plans to convert the former Super Kmart site above Montour Run Road into a regional headquarters advanced with approval of a zoning change from highway commercial to business park.

Chevron officials are expected to be present for a public hearing for the development site plans at 7 p.m Dec. 4 at the supervisors meeting in the municipal building auditorium.

Chevron's attorney Dusty Elias Kirk, representing Chevron, said the site will be converted into a corporate campus that would be planned and developed in phases. She said it would also allow a laboratory, which would be in the first phase of the development, to be a part of the technical excellence center.

* In celebration of the township's 225th anniversary, residents are invited to share their stories and memories of people, places and how the township has changed over the years. Send information to asergeant@moontwp.com.

* Bon Meade Elementary School needs a crossing guard. The police department has an opening for a part-time guard from 7:45 to 9 a.m. and from 2:30 to 3:45 p.m. for Bon Meade. The pay is $13.92 per hour without benefits. Equipment, clothing and training is provided by the police department. To apply, call 412-262-5000 or visit the police station.

* Supervisors recognized the Montour Trail Council with a proclamation celebrating the 20th anniversary of the trail being opened in the township. The nonprofit volunteer organization was founded in 1989. The trail section in Moon opened in October 1993.

Oakdale

Council members voted last Thursday to appoint Michelle Franchek of Oakdale as assistant borough secretary to work 16 hours a week. Hourly rate is $10.50. She replaces Jan Leopold, who resigned in October.

* Council members approved four lots for the Allegheny County Vacant Property Program, which allows property owners to buy adjacent parcels that are vacant and tax delinquent. The program waives back taxes and liens and pays most closing costs. Two parcels are on Noblestown Road, one is on Highland Avenue North and one is a right-of-way, according to the Allegheny County real estate website.

Robinson

Commissioners voted last Thursday to adopt a sewage facilities plan, to be submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, for a proposed apartment complex along the Parkway West.

The Ridge at Robinson is a proposed five-building, 400-unit apartment complex on 40 acres, near the Settler's Ridge shopping center and Robinson municipal building, township planning director Rick Urbano said.

The township has received conceptual plans for the project, which would require major traffic improvements on McCormick Road and the upper part of Church Hill Road, he said.

The applicant is Fore Property Co., a national real estate firm that develops, constructs and manages multifamily housing properties, according to the company's website.

* A $1 million project to improve pedestrian, bicycle and transit facilities in Robinson Town Centre is set to begin March 1.

Robinson commissioners have given permission to the Airport Corridor Transportation Association to schedule road work from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. weekdays on Park Manor Boulevard near IKEA. One lane will be closed in each direction during work, expected to occur from March to July.

The township allowed daylight work under the condition that if the project greatly increases traffic congestion, contractors would shift to nighttime work.

Plans include a four-way intersection with a traffic signal, crosswalks, a bus shelter with amenities and shared bicycle lanes connecting the shopping center with the Montour Trail.

* Commissioners on Nov. 7 directed the planning commission to review the political sign and the general sign ordinances and to recommend changes to any potential conflicts between the sets of regulations. The vote was 3-0, with two members absent.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania had written a letter to Robinson last month saying the township was selectively enforcing campaign sign restrictions and contending the rules violate the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

* The fall leaf collection program has been extended through Nov. 22.

Scott

Township officials announced Tuesday that they will not pursue a request by some Orchard Spring Road residents to reduce the number of Port Authority buses that use the road.

"We don't have any power with the Port Authority," Commissioner Bill Wells said in announcing the township's decision not to push for a route reduction on that street.

Some residents complained in recent months that more than 60 Port Authority buses travel on the road each day.

* Township engineer Larry Lennon reported that reconstruction work is nearly complete on Rockfield Road, the final project on this year's road improvement program.

Dennis Moorcroft of Berkwood Drive asked if the township has come up with a plan to reduce flooding on both sides of Bower Hill Road. Commissioner David Jason said the fix would not be a simple solution.

"There are going to be a lot of things that have to be discussed," he said.

* Officials may purchase signs that say "Drive like your kids live here" for streets where there have been speeding complaints. Township manager Denise Fitzgerald said money for the signs is available in the budget. Commissioners could vote on the matter in December.

* Scott Library director Janet Forton will be resigning because her husband is being transferred to Ohio. An open house will be held Wednesday in Mrs. Forton's honor.


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