Parking issues pondered in Carnegie

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More than 20 residents at a public workshop Monday discussed possible traffic and parking changes on congested Beechwood, Christy and Library avenues and Capitol Drive.

The area is busy with residential traffic and automobiles heading to the Carnegie Boys and Girls Club and Carnegie Towers.

One of the Towers' lots is not being used much, with visitors preferring to park on the streets and away from camera monitors, some officials said.

Councilman Pat Catena said he would like to see Capitol made one-way and to have no parking on both sides of Christy.

But representatives from the Boys and Girls Club said that facility cannot afford to lose any parking spots.

"On any given day between 3-8 p.m. we have 250 families coming to the club," said one woman.

"We've got every nook and cranny filled."

The club is trying to find additional parking.

Bob Heinrich, former Carnegie mayor, said changing traffic to one way will result in more problems, such as increased speed and access problems for emergency vehicles like fire engines and ambulances.

Debbie Weigner of Beechwood Avenue was opposed to one-way thoroughfares.

"I just don't like one-way streets," she said.

But council President Rick D'Loss predicted the borough may see more one-way thoroughfares in coming years.

Officials also discussed permit parking on Beechwood near Carnegie Towers.

Mr. Heinrich suggested that permit fees be high enough to support another police department hire.

Maggie Forbes, executive director of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, noted, "We need to all work together to solve this."

Mr. Catena said he would want a provision included in any traffic pattern changes so that the alterations would automatically end after three months if they aren't successful.

neigh_west - neigh_south

Carole Gilbert Brown, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.


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