Carnegie manager hopes to get grants


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Carnegie officials are saying good things about the borough's new manager, 27-year-old Steve Beuter.

Mr. Beuter was council's unanimous choice Aug. 12 for the job.

He had been interim manager for the town after its former manager, Jeff Harbin, left in June for retirement.

In approving his appointment, council President Rick D'Loss said, "He's been part of the team for some time."

Councilwoman Carol Covi added the words "most definitely" to her "yes" vote.

Later, she said, "He is young, self-motivated, bright, gets things done and has a good attitude."

Mr. Beuter has a three-year contract with the borough. He said one of his goals is to obtain more grant money for the town.

He said he is equally pleased with his new job and his new bosses -- the six-member council and the mayor.

"I think we all work well as a team," he said. "It's going well so far."

Though he has been comfortable handling the tasks put before him so far, Mr. Beuter said he knows that the future is likely to bring new challenges.

He is a graduate of Chartiers Valley High School and holds a degree in business management from Robert Morris University.

He came to Carnegie three years ago as an administrative assistant. He lives in Scott.

The 119-year-old community was formed by the 1894 union of Mansfield and Chartiers boroughs. The resulting borough, which has a population of 8,400, is composed of a mix of old and new architecture and has a vibrant business district with residential areas of varying ages.

Mr. Beuter said he's looking forward to being part of Carnegie's future and making new contacts on the borough's behalf. "I do think it'll be a good thing," he said.

neigh_west

Carole Gilbert Brown, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.


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