Threats made against Bush, Obama and Secret Service agents outlined in McKees Rocks case

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A federal judge late Thursday unsealed documents describing threats prosecutors claim a McKees Rocks man made against two U.S. Secret Service agents.

Jesse Almendarez, whose age was not immediately available, faces charges of threatening a federal officer and making an interstate threat.

According to an affidavit unsealed on the U.S. District Court docket, Mr. Almendarez in late 2011 emailed "threatening statements against President Barack Obama" to the Reagan Library.

From then until mid-2012, Secret Service agents visited Mr. Almendarez five times in response to other threatening communications regarding Mr. Obama or former President George W. Bush, or to observe him during Mr. Obama's visits to the region, according to the affidavit.

The threats against the presidents were not detailed in the affidavit.

Mr. Almendarez, according to the affidavit, posted threats against the two agents on a Department of Veterans Affairs messaging system in December. He wrote he was "almost mad enough to go to their office and kill them both in the parking lot on their way to their car," according to the affidavit.

In April, according to the affidavit, he wrote an email to Harris County [Texas] Judge Ed Emmett, claiming that he was "bout [sic] to start going to kill these stupid professional [expletive], myself, and I don't own a gun, you know what I mean?"

U.S. Magistrate Judge ruled earlier this week that Mr. Almendarez should be detained pending trial because there is a serious risk that he will harm others.

The assistant federal public defender representing Mr. Almendarez could not be reached for comment today.

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Rich Lord: rlord@post-gazette.com, 412-263-1542 and on Twitter: @richelord.


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