Sto-Rox school officials unhappy with test results

Share with others:


Print Email Read Later

Sto-Rox High School students in grades 9-11 did not fare well in the winter Keystone Exams.

Superintendent Michael Panza shared the results last Thursday night with school directors.

"Unfortunately, the results are not good," he said. Here are the test scores:

• Algebra I -- Of 184 students, 10 ranked in the advanced level, 31 were proficient, 84 were basic and 58 were below basic.

• Biology -- Of 171 students, none were advanced, 17 were proficient, 49 were basic and 101 were below basic.

• Literature -- Of 174 students, none were advanced, 57 were proficient, 71 were basic and 44 were below basic.

In each grade, there were students who could have taken the test but did not participate.

The Keystone Exams are a component of Pennsylvania's new system of high school graduation requirements designed to help districts guide students toward meeting state standards. The exams are end-of-course assessments.

To address the poor scores, the district plans to add advanced placement calculus and biology next year. Advanced placement literature was added this year.

In other news, 29 seniors were recognized for having been accepted into a program of postsecondary education following graduation. The list of students does not include those who have applied for acceptance to community colleges because enrollments there are not available until April.

Directors James Grimm and Brian Taylor will attend Pennsylvania's Western District community safety meeting April 11. It will be presented by U.S. Attorney David Hickton.

The board also approved seeking bids to replace and upgrade the high school fire alarm system.

Additionally, bids will be sought for painting services for interior surfaces in the high school.

education - neigh_west

Sonja Reis, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.


Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

You have 2 remaining free articles this month

Try unlimited digital access

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here

You’ve reached the limit of free articles this month.

To continue unlimited reading

If you are an existing subscriber,
link your account for free access. Start here