No tax increase set for Coraopolis

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Coraopolis council has approved a $4.1 million budget for 2013 that keeps the 10.13-mill property tax rate for the eighth year. And, the borough's Water & Sewer Authority has approved a budget that lowers water and sewer rates.

Coraopolis council met Dec. 19 to adopt the budget by a 6-0 vote. Councilman Dan La Rocco and Diane Flasco Pittman were absent.

The property tax rate has not been raised since 2005, according to Manager Ray McCutcheon. While the millage rate won't change next year, some home-owners could have a higher tax bill if the reassessment of their property is higher than the average reassessment for all properties in the district, which covers Coraopolis and Neville.

Each mill is expected to generate approximately $180,000.

Councilman Robb Cardimen, vice president of the Water & Sewer Authority, said customers will see a decrease in their water and sewer bills. He said the rate will drop from $11.41 to $10.84 per thousand gallons.

He said operating efficiencies coupled with a windfall settlement of litigation against oil companies for spilling contaminates in the water are reasons for the drop in rates.

In other action, council members and the mayor paid tribute to Charles "Chick" White who had served as a police officer for more than 20 years and had been a council member. Mr. White, 88, died on Dec. 15.

Among the anecdotes was a story by Councilman Dave Pendel who recalled that when he was went all-night bowling in high school, "Chick" would pick him up in his police car and drive him home so Mr. Pendel didn't have to wake his parents.

The family requests that donations be sent to the Mount Olive Baptist Church, 1201 Hiland Ave., Coraopolis, PA 15108.

neigh_west

Kim Lawrence, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.


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