Washington County man convicted of illegal financial transactions

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An Eighty-Four man was found guilty today of structuring his purchases of two houses, a tractor, a dump truck and a pick-up truck, after a week-long trial that focused on his cocaine dealing.

Daniel Young, 42, bought those items using a conspicuous string of cashier's checks and wads of cash, mostly in amounts very close to $9,000, assistant U.S. attorney Brendan Conway told a jury in federal court. Transactions of $10,000 or more must be reported to the IRS.

At one point, Young put a $97,000 down payment on a house after moving money in chunks of roughly $9,000 through five accounts in four banks over eight days, Mr. Conway said.

"He just didn't want those reports filed, either because he was a drug dealer, a tax cheat, or both," Mr. Conway told the jury.

Defense attorney Noah Geary countered that Young quit school after 9th grade, made his money through excavation work, and wasn't sophisticated enough to concoct a scheme to hide money.

Mr. Geary said that big cocaine dealers buy sports cars. "Well, Daniel Young buys a 7 1/2-ton dump truck."

Because the jury found Young guilty, they are now being asked to render a special verdict on whether he must forfeit to the government the vehicles and two properties -- a rental and his house -- plus $253,750 that the prosecution contends is related to the illegal transactions.

Young was convicted in 2011 of drug possession with intent to deliver and related crimes in Washington County Court of Common Pleas.

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Rich Lord: rlord@post-gazette.com, 412-263-1542 or Twitter @richelord.


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