Brownsville Community Festival, Ducky Race to expand

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The third annual Brownsville Community Festival and Ducky Race is scheduled for Aug. 4 with an expanded slate of activities.

"It's growing every year," said Jack Lawver, Brownsville council president. "We've had more support this year from the community than ever before to keep this going and make it a success."

The festival will cap off a week of homecoming activities, including the annual Brownsville Firemen's Community Picnic on Aug. 2 at Kennywood Park.

This year will mark the 99th community picnic at Kennywood -- the second longest-running event in the park's history.

It's the third year for the festival and the fourth for the Ducky Race, slated for 3:30 p.m. at the Brownsville Riverside Wharf, where hundreds of yellow plastic ducks will be dropped from the Inter-County Bridge into the water. The first three to float across the finish line win prizes, including a weekend in Pittsburgh, a $200 Dick's Sporting Goods gift card and various gift cards valued at $100.

Ducks can be purchased now for $5 each at the offices of the Brownsville Area Revitalization Corp. at 69 Market St. or on the day of the festival.

The festival will kick off at 9 a.m. with a 5K race at Brownsville High School, followed by the opening of food and entertainment booths at 11 a.m. at Snowdon Square.

At noon, a community parade will step off, featuring local fire and emergency vehicles along with local bands, dance troupes and costumed characters. The parade will begin on Market Street, circle around town and end near Snowdon Square.

The festival will include vendors, musical performances and free children's activities, including face painting.

Additional activities are planned for the Market Street Academy & Performing Arts Center, and the day will conclude with a free "Music on the Mon" concert from 6 to 8 p.m. in the square.

For more information: 724-785-3363.

neigh_south

Janice Crompton: jcrompton@post-gazette.com or 412-851-1867.


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