New data shows up to 11 suspected heroin-fentanyl deaths in Pittsburgh; five in Allegheny County

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Of 14 deaths in Allegheny County believed to be caused by fentanyl-laced heroin, nine took place in the City of Pittsburgh and the rest occurred in the county outside the city limits, according to data compiled by the medical examiner's office and released this afternoon.

Results are pending for another two deaths, both in Pittsburgh, which are the most recent suspected fatal overdoses connected to the outbreak this month of tainted heroin in Western Pennsylvania.

The communities where the deaths took place are Aspinwall, Castle Shannon, Coraopolis, Penn Hills and Tarentum.

In those cases, about 16 differently marked stamp bags were found.

Testing that occurred on drug residue found in two of the bags, both marked "Theraflu," yielded positive results for both heroin and fentanyl.

In another case involving the "Magic City" brand, heroin was found on the bag and a spoon used in connection with the drug was positive for heroin and fentanyl.

The age range of victims is from 25 to 50.

Preliminary toxicology results for the victims showed the presence of both an opiate and fentanyl in 14 cases. Another two cases are pending.

With additional suspected heroin-laced fentanyl deaths in Armstrong, Butler and Westmoreland counties, the suspected death toll in Western Pennsylvania stands at 21 and could rise to 23 if the two pending cases turn out to be positive for heroin and fentanyl..

The earliest date of the suspected overdoses is Jan. 16.


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