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Hampton

Council passed an ordinance Nov. 28 that will encourage establishments with gaming machines to pay the township's fee for such machines on time, if not early.

Council president Victor Son said the township sent bills Jan. 1 to establishments with gaming machines, but officials encountered problems with collecting the fees.

Under the new program, businesses paying early get an incentive. Conversely, the township is taking a more aggressive penalty approach to businesses who pay late.

There is a flat fee per machine, but businesses with many machines (Wildwood Highlands, for example) will get a break on the dollar amount of excess units.

If a business pays early, it will receive a 2 percent reduction for the first 30 days; then the fee will revert to a flat rate. There is now a 2 percent per month penalty on businesses that don't pay on time.

Also during the meeting, Mr. Son named Captain Michael Pecora as interim police chief. He will take over the duties of Chief Dan Connolly, who retired last week.

Captain Pecora is expected to become chief in January.

Ross

Commissioners tabled an ordinance Monday night that made all of Fairley Road a no-parking zone.

Commissioner Peter Ferraro said police Chief Robert Bellan spent hours of deliberation with Bill and Bob Ansell, who have angered neighbors over parking large vehicles on the street.

The Ansells contend that other neighbors extended their driveways into the street, making portions of the street narrower than township specifications.

"With due diligence, hopefully we can solve the situation out there and move forward with an item that has been exhausted over the years and, hopefully, we can bring it to a conclusion," Mr. Ferraro said.

• Commissioners Peter Ferraro, David Mikec and John Sponcer will look into the feasibility of a new public works garage. The current garage is deteriorating, and the township is renting equipment to shore up the roof and walls.

"We need to seriously consider what we are going to do with that building. It is in very serious shape," Mr. Sponcer said. "We need to have another engineer come in and look and see if we can keep it. Because I don't think we can."

There might be space on the property where the township keeps its salt supply, or maybe on the township building property, commissioners said.

• Commissioners heard a presentation on a Comprehensive Recreation, Park and Open Space Plan.

"You really have a nice park system," said Bob Good of Pashek Associates, adding that the recreation department is "excellent. There are a tremendous number and good balance of programs that are being offered."

Although the community center and its adjacent park and ball fields are in excellent condition, the same cannot be said for the older facilities, Mr. Good said.

Those facilities are aging, maintenance has been deferred and ball fields are deteriorating, he said.

"The community center park needs to be an example for others. You need to look at maintaining the others to that level of care."

The report looked in depth at Evergreen and Denny parks, and it would cost $2 million to totally rehabilitate them, Mr. Good said.

In addition, he recommended that the township rehabilitate its facilities in eight phases, with at least one park in each ward done during the first three years at an annual cost of $150,000.

It would also cost $70,000 a year just to maintain the facilities, he added.

The report also included input from residents about their desires. At the top of the list is adding to and maintaining a trail system, Mr. Good said. "That is not easy to do in Ross because the community is pretty built up," he said.

Residents also cited the need for a swimming pool or spray park, but Mr. Good said residents did not say that Ross needed to build a pool.

Instead, it was recommended that the township make arrangements for residents to have better access to pools in neighboring communities, such as the Bellevue Pool, which is in Ross.

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