New law in Bellevue aims to curb nuisance calls to police

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Council members voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a new law regarding excessive police calls.

Calls regarding nuisance issues -- including loud music, public alcohol consumption, drug use, late night noise and chronic dog barking -- that frequently recur at the same location will begin to incur a fee of $100 for every time the police are called.

Property owners will be responsible for payment, according to the new ordinance.

Solicitor Tom McDermott said the new law is meant to address "frat-houselike behavior" in local apartment complexes.

"The new ordinance is designed to help regulate rental properties and help landlords to police their own properties," he explained, adding that it is intended to curb excessive calls to police.

Mr. McDermott noted that he has included language into the ordinance which will ensure that landlords don't discriminate against renting to certain people.

"This ordinance will not apply to police calls related to domestic violence, child abuse or other significant forms of criminal activity in which the residents of the property are alleged to be victims of," he said.

Council also approved an ordinance which establishes a $15 fee for police to provide fingerprinting services to the public.

Mr. McDermott said the service will most often be utilized by employers seeking background checks on prospective employees.

At a recent meeting, the borough received a $170 check to the new Bellevue Dog Woods off-leash dog park from Aaryn Nitsch of the Liberty in Bellevue citizens group.

According to Ms. Nitsch, the donation represents all of the money the group raised during National Night Out last month.

neigh_north

Jill Cueni-Cohen, freelance writer: suburbanliving@post-gazette.com.


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