Kasunic to retire from state Senate

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State Sen. Richard Kasunic, D-Dunbar, announced Thursday he will retire in November from a 32-year career in the General Assembly.

Mr. Kasunic, 67, represents Fayette and parts of Somerset, Washington and Westmoreland counties, and also serves as chairman of the Senate Democratic Caucus. He was elected to the state House of Representatives in 1982 and the Senate in 1994.

He named the procurement of funding for construction of the Mon-Fayette Expressway in Fayette County and expansion of State Route 219 in Somerset County as among his foremost legislative accomplishments.

He also cited authoring a state law on coal mine safety.

“It has been an honor and a privilege to represent the fine people of our area over the past three-plus decades,” Mr. Kasunic said in a statement. “This decision was honestly not an easy one, but after much soul-searching I decided that, it is time to devote myself to spending quality time with my friends, and more importantly, my family, in this next chapter of my life.”

Mr. Kasunic is among a number of state senators who have said they will not seek another term. Sen. Jim Ferlo, the Highland Park Democrat, cited redistricting when he made his announcement in November.

Others include Sen. Mike Brubaker, R-Lancaster, Sen. Bob Robbins, R-Mercer, and Sen. Ted Erickson, R-Delaware.

Sen. Mike Waugh, R-York, resigned in January to become executive director of the Pennsylvania Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg.


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