Pittsburgh man charged in fatal Murrysville crash

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A North Shore man has been charged with homicide by vehicle while driving under the influence and other crimes after Murrysville police said tests showed he was speeding and drinking before he crashed into another car.

Murrysville police wrote in a criminal complaint that they found David McCormick, 43, crying near the scene of the Oct. 9 crash along Route 22 near Manor Road that killed 66-year-old Francis Cossick of Camp Hill, Cumberland County.

Police wrote that a blood test taken nearly two hours after the crash -- after investigators obtained a search warrant -- revealed that Mr. McCormick's blood-alcohol content was 0.197, more than twice the legal limit for driving.

They also wrote that a detective who analyzed the crime scene suspected Mr. McCormick was driving his black Audi at least 107 mph through a 45 mph zone before he collided with the silver Volvo Mr. Cossick was driving.

Shortly after the crash, Mr. McCormick spoke freely with investigators, according to the complaint. Mr. McCormick, who is 5-foot-7 and weighs 150 pounds, told them he had at least three drinks that night and was heading to an ex's house.

"He also stated he did not know what happened and that it was like hitting a wall," according to the complaint.

Then, according to the complaint, he said, "I hope I did not kill that man."

Online court records show that Mr. McCormick is scheduled to appear in court for a preliminary hearing Jan. 16. In addition to the homicide by vehicle while DUI charge, Mr. McCormick also faces charges of homicide by vehicle, driving under the influence, recklessly endangering another person reckless driving and driving at unsafe speeds.

Mr. McCormick's defense attorney, Kenneth Burkley, said he did not wish to comment until he had a chance to more thoroughly review the complaint.



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