Ads would promote the positive in Woodland Hills

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Longtime Woodland Hills High School football coach Joe Lafferty laid out what he called a "clear, scheduled message" to inform parents, residents and taxpayers about the positives in the district.

He said he came up with television, print, billboard and Internet ads after a discussion with the district's community relations forum. The ads will use the phrase "Woodland Hills: Where Diversity Works" and showcase the district's diversity and the things the district does best, Mr. Lafferty told the school board during its meeting last week.

He said the primary target of the ads will be parents who live in the district but don't send their children to Woodland Hills schools. Other ads will be aimed at taxpayers, to show them what goes on in the district and how their tax dollars are being spent.

Three-minute vignettes will feature successful Woodland hills alumni in business, theater, the armed forces and education, he said.

Substitute superintendent Alan Johnson asked Mr. Lafferty for a specific proposal and cost, as well as a sample advertisement.

Board member Robert Tomasic said the primary concern of parents in the district is student safety, particularly on school buses, and suggested Mr. Lafferty include information about school safety in the ads.

The board also voted unanimously to dispose of a unusable textbooks, but board members were quick to question whether the books could be donated or reused in some way.

"We pulled every usable text out," Mr. Johnson said.

Board President Marilyn Messina said that if any books could be sold, any revenue from the sale of the books should go toward purchasing new books at elementary school libraries.

The board recessed and plans to reconvene at 7 p.m. today for a special meeting on plans for renovations in the district.

education - neigh_east

Annie Siebert: asiebert@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1613. Twitter: @AnnieSiebert.


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