Interim director at Shuman Center made permanent


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Earl F. Hill, the interim director for the Shuman Juvenile Detention Center, has been chosen as its new director.

Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald announced the designation in a news release issued by his office Friday.

The promotion was effective July 21, Mr. Fitzgerald said. Mr. Hill receives an annual salary of $102,318.

Mr. Hill, 69, arrived at the Shuman Center in December as interim director of the juvenile detention facility, which is in Lincoln-Lemington and opened in 1974. Recent years have been rocky for Shuman, which in 2013 briefly saw its full license downgraded to a provisional license by the state Department of Public Welfare.

An incident in which a guard allegedly shoved a teenage resident, and complaints about working conditions by Shuman employees, have added to its troubles.

Last summer, Shuman director William T. Simmons was fired, and William S. Stickman III was named interim director. He stepped down in December 2013 to spend more time with family, and Mr. Hill took his place.

County manager William McKain, in describing Mr. Hill’s appointment last year, said his experience included serving as regional director of the state Juvenile Justice Services bureau and director of St. Francis Hospital’s Adolescent Chemical Dependency Unit.

He has a master’s degree in psychology from Sonoma State University and a bachelor’s degree from Heidelberg College.


Kaitlynn Riely: kriely@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1707.

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