1,100 Pennsylvanians get credit for passing scores on portions of old GED exam

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The state Department of Education today said 1,100 Pennsylvanians have been able to transfer passing scores from a section of the old GED exam to the new exam that replaced it in January.

When the national GED Testing Service replaced the old exam, more than 43,000 Pennsylvanians had not passed all of the sections of the exam offered since 2002.

A process was devised to enable test-takers to carry over successful scores from one or more sections of the 2002 GED exam to the 2014 GED exam to earn a Commonwealth Secondary School Diploma.

Since January, 1,994 test-takers have asked to transfer scores. So far, 1,887 of the requests have been evaluated, with 1,100 determined to have qualifying scores that can be transferred to the new test.

In a news release, acting state Education Secretary Carolyn Dumaresq credited state Rep. Joe Hackett, R-Delaware, sponsor of House Bill 1931, and Rep. Hal English, R-Hampton, with helping "to streamline this process to remove a barrier that would have delayed a group of citizens from obtaining their secondary credentials."

In the news release, Mr. English said, “I am pleased that we will be able to eliminate an unnecessary obstacle for an adult population that is already facing many challenges. It was apparent to me that without this change many Pennsylvanians would lose previously earned partial credits and would give up pursuing their GED."


Education writer Eleanor Chute: echute@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1955. First Published August 4, 2014 12:00 AM

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